Dragonfly Designs by Alisa
yeoldefashion:

Bergère straw hat decorated in colored straw flowers, dates to the 1760s.

yeoldefashion:

Bergère straw hat decorated in colored straw flowers, dates to the 1760s.

fripperiesandfobs:

Reproduction robe paree ca. 1780

From Reine des Centfeuilles

Hee.  It makes me chuckle when people get all up in a froth about the lack of historical accuracy of these costumes.  Yes, sometimes it is a *very bad thing* when historical costuming in film goes non-historical.  But this one is intentionally a fantasy, and it’s STEAMPUNK.  If you do steampunk in a completely historically accurate way, I wouldn’t go as far to say you’re doing it ‘wrong’, but you are kind of missing the point.  Steampunk is supposed to be creative and FUN.  These costumes are beautiful (well, minus a couple of them) and they are creative and FUN.  Steampunk adaptations for the WIN! 

And yeah.  I completely want to make a couple of Milady’s dresses!

ornamentedbeing:

If I hear/read one more person talk about the accuracy of these costumes I cannot be held for my actions.

This. Just. SO. WRONG on so many levels.

Comments like this MAKE ME SOB “wielding a sword, Rococo skirts flying,” or “ringlet hair, and grand Rococo dresses with high collars ” or my favorite from the same post “17th century French aristocrat fashion.”

Also, Queen Elizabeth I called and wants her collar back.

Like right now.

oldrags:

Dress, ca 1892, Abiti Antichi

oldrags:

Dress, ca 1892, Abiti Antichi

ornamentedbeing:

© Museum of London, Philip Treacy, Yasemen Hussein
The backdrop to and theme of the exhibition, as envisaged by the curators, Beatrice Behlen, and Hilary Davidson, is a masquerade in a Georgian Pleasure Garden. One of the party-goers wears a midnight-blue crinoline, printed with golden stars, and topped with a copper ‘antlers’ head-dress, which soars into the twinkling night-scape. The head-dress was crafted by Yasemen Hussein, inspired by Diana, the goddess of the hunt and the moon, which was a popular fancy-dress costume of the era.

ornamentedbeing:

© Museum of London, Philip Treacy, Yasemen Hussein

The backdrop to and theme of the exhibition, as envisaged by the curators, Beatrice Behlen, and Hilary Davidson, is a masquerade in a Georgian Pleasure Garden. One of the party-goers wears a midnight-blue crinoline, printed with golden stars, and topped with a copper ‘antlers’ head-dress, which soars into the twinkling night-scape. The head-dress was crafted by Yasemen Hussein, inspired by Diana, the goddess of the hunt and the moon, which was a popular fancy-dress costume of the era.

fripperiesandfobs:

Reproduction robe a l’anglaise ca. 1780

From Reine des Centfeuilles

omgthatdress:

Cycling suit ca. 1896-1898 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Cycling suit ca. 1896-1898 via The Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Cycling ensemble ca. 1895 via The Kyoto Costume Institute

omgthatdress:

Cycling ensemble ca. 1895 via The Kyoto Costume Institute

americanduchess:

Black and white day.  I love this. 

americanduchess:

Black and white day.  I love this.